Food Allergy Suggestions

  • Ask your doctor what to expect and teach others.

    If your doctor thinks there is a risk of severe allergic reaction or anaphylaxis, learn all you can and teach family, friends and caregivers to understand symptoms and treatment. The following links to the great organization Food Allergy Research and Eduction (FARE) might provide important information.

    Definitions and frequently asked questions:
    Common Food Allergens
    Food Allergy FAQ
    Anaphylaxis FAQ

    Printable handouts (PDF Format):
    What You Should Know about Living with Food Allergy
    Do you have a Food Allergy?

  • If recommended, keep a medication kit and know how to use it.

    If there is a risk of severe allergic reaction or anaphylaxis, ask your doctor to help you decide what to include in your food allergy medication kit, and help you learn to use it. Keep your medication kit with you or your child at all times. Include a clear, simple “Food Allergy Action Plan” with important phone numbers. Teach anyone who might need to use it.

    Sample Food Allergy Action Plan from FARE

    Epi Auto Injector Demonstrations:
    How To Use EpiPen

    How To Use Auvi-Q

    How To Use Twinject

  • Know your problem foods.

    Know your problem foods and any tricky alternate food names, similar allergens or routine contaminants.

    Did you know that whey is made from milk? And, that spelt is so closely related to wheat it can cause same health problems? Or, did you know that some spices and grains are milled in situations where nut contamination is likely? Or that most oats produced in the U.S. are wheat-contaminated due to shared fields and machinery?

    FARE info on food labels and alternate food names

    Lucy’s delicious cookies are made without the common food allergens --- wheat, milk, eggs, peanuts and tree nuts. We also test for trace amounts of these allergens. In addition, our oats are certified “gluten free”. All of our products are made in a dedicated facility. Our goal is to provide excellent foods that you can trust.

  • Beware of confusing food labels.

    Shop wisely. Understand FALCPA, the law concerning food labeling requirements for the eight major food allergens. Beware of confusing labels that have “may contain” or similar statements. Learn more about label language and manufacturing practices. Don’t take chances; it’s not worth the risk.

    More on FALCPA from FARE
    More on “may contain” language from FARE

  • Understand what "allergen free" really means.

    Understand what “allergen free” really means. It’s a catch-all phrase that can be confusing. There is no official definition of this term. Most people use it to say that foods are made without certain ingredients. The tricky part is making sure the product you are considering is truly without your allergens. That’s why on our labels we say “made without milk, eggs, wheat, gluten, peanuts and tree nuts.”  Details are important!

    Otherwise, we have noticed that “allergen free” usually refers to the eight major food allergens: milk, eggs, wheat, soy, peanuts, tree nuts, fish and shellfish. Ninety percent of people with food allergies are allergic to at least one of these. However, it’s important to know that some people are allergic to other foods; for example: sesame, corn, strawberries.

    Another important thing is to know how a company ensures that their product is made without certain ingredients. At Dr. Lucy’s we have incorporated three key features into our Quality Program. First, we buy our raw materials from carefully selected producers. Thus we are starting with ingredients that are presumed to be without certain allergens. Then, we use the best available testing to make sure there are no detectable allergens from our list. Lastly, we don’t allow wheat, gluten, milk, eggs, peanuts or tree nuts into our bakery. So, we remove the chance of cross-contact during production. These three safeguards allow us to provide the highest quality foods made without certain ingredients.

     

    Lucy’s delicious cookies are made without the common food allergens --- wheat, milk, eggs, peanuts and tree nuts. We also test for trace amounts of these allergens. In addition, our oats are certified “gluten free”. All of our products are made in a dedicated facility. Our goal is to provide excellent foods that you can trust.

  • Consider storing foods separately.

    Consider storing allergy foods separate from safe foods at home. Label a shelf or container so these foods will be handled with extra concern. This can help reduce mistakes and confusion. To avoid cross-contact, use a clean utensil each time you dip into a multi-use container, or use squeeze bottles when you can (ex. butter/margarine, mustard, honey, mayonnaise, etc.).

  • Consider eliminating some foods from your home.

    To simplify, consider eliminating some foods from your home. Again, this helps to reduce mistakes and confusion for many people. It also saves on storage space. And, instead of singling out the person with allergies, you will find more and more food items that the whole family enjoys together safely. You might find that the new foods are healthier for the whole family! Weigh the pros and cons for yourself.

    Purchase Lucy's® online.

    Find a store near you.

  • Provide alternate foods.

    Provide tasty alternate foods at social and school or religious events. Choose items that everyone will enjoy together.

    Purchase Lucy's® online.

    Find a store near you.

  • Tell friends and family about food items you like.

    Your family and friends will want to serve foods that everyone can eat. Be prepared to let them know which foods are okay and where to get them.

    Purchase Lucy's® online.

    Find a store near you.

  • Buy a good book on food allergies.

    Buy a comprehensive book on food allergies. This will save time, money and effort in the long run. Read it and share with others.

    Some examples are:
    Food Allergies for Dummies
    Understanding and Managing Your Child's Food Allergies

  • Consider joining FARE and KFA.

    Consider joining FARE (Food Allergy Research and Education) and KFA (Kids with Food Allergies). They're working on policies and programs to enhance food allergy health and safety and the do a fantastic job.

    About FARE

    About KFA

  • Consider joining a local support organization.

    Consider joining a local support organization. Meet friends with food allergies. Trade recipes and ideas. We’ll send cookies for one of your meetings.

    Support Groups

  • Have a plan for dining out.

    If you dine out, be sure to tell the server about all of the ingredients you must avoid. You might ask for special food preparation pans and utensils to avoid surfaces that might contain allergens (ex. grills, ice cream scoops, spoons, deli slicers, etc.). Avoid restaurants that specialize in foods that contain concerning allergens (ex. seafood, Asian/nuts). Avoid fried foods that share cooking oils with problem foods (ex. breading, fish). Stay away from salad bars since foods routinely drop from serving spoons into other containers.

    This is not a time to be timid; if you feel unsure about the situation talk with the restaurant manager or select a different restaurant.

    “Chef cards” are becoming increasingly popular with individuals who have food allergies, and are designed to alert restaurant staff to the ingredients that need to be avoided. Download yours now from FARE.

  • Keep a list of questions for your allergist.

    Keep a list of questions for your allergist. This will help you accomplish more at each visit.